A CIESE Collaborative Project

Fall 2003 Student Reports

St. Joan Antida High School

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

We really enjoyed working on this project. It was interesting to know that other students from so many different states and countries were working on the same thing. Our hypothesis was that the type of heating device and the volume of water would have the most effect on the boiling temperature of water.

During our experiment, we heated 500 mL of distilled water in beaker over a bunsen burner. We took readings every 30 seconds and watched as the temperature increased. When the temperature didn't increase for 5 minutes we recorded that temperature as the boiling point.

Afterwards we took all of the data and prepared four graphs in Excel. We made XY scatter plots of sample volume, room temperature, and elevation versus the boiling point. For the type of heating device, we sorted the data by device and took an average for each. We then prepared a bar graph of the type of heating device versus boiling temperature. We looked at the trend lines and correlations for each of the graphs and found out that elevation was the factor that had the greatest effect on the boiling point of water.

If we repeated this experiment in the future, we would take temperature readings less often than every 30 seconds because it really took awhile for it to heat up. We also think it would be interesting to look at how the boiling point changes for different types of water or even salt water.

 

Bay Lane Middle School

Muskego, Wisconsin

We participated in the Boiling Point Lab and found out that Elavation was the variable that affected the boiling point of water. Elevations that were lower had lower boiling points, higher elevations seemed to be higher. Although the data sometimes seemed not to fit.

Our classes had different hypotheses, Mrs. Kotschi's class thought that the heating device would affect the boiling point and Ms. Kordus' class thought it would be the amount of water. Neither had a big difference.

We have been talking about accuracy alot in science. We think that some of the data might not be as accurate as others and that the big range of data was hard to look at. We made "big" data tables to try and fit all of it in.

We might not have so many variables or at least not so many different devices or amounts of water.

We did try other liquids to see if the boiling point would change and for the most part it didn't. We tried coffee, juice, vinigar, Gatorade, white and chocolate milk and a few others. Our room sure did stink! What did change was the time it took for different things to boil.

We learned a lot from this experiment.
Bay Lane Middle School
Muskego, Wisconsin

 

Tigerton Middle School

Tigerton, Wisconsin

Hi from Tigerton Middle School,
When we first started this project we thought the boiling point would change when there were different amounts of water. We took everyone's data and put it into a scatter plot on an excel spreadsheet. The graph that showed the most pattern was elevation. As elevation increases the boiling point decreases. That makes sense since at higher elevations there is less air pressure and the bubbles have an easier time reaching the surface of the water.
We realized that with lesser water the water might boil faster, but not a lower temperature.

 

The Spatz O'Brien Homeschool

Washington, DC

We performed the boiling experiment on three successive days, expecting both elevation and volume of water to be correlated with boiling point.Following our own experiments, we used the entire "Boil, Boil, Toil and Trouble" group's data to create scatter graphs for boiling point versus elevation, boiling point versus room temperature, and boiling point versus volume of water. We also did a chart for heating device.

We did not perform regression analysis (although we discussed the procedure) but based our results on informal analysis. Room temperature and volume of water did not appear to be correlated with boiling point. Elevation did appear to be correlated: boiling point is lower at higher elevations and approaches 100 only at elevations near zero.

Our hypothesis was proven to be incorrect. We are curious, still, as to the relationship between time to reach a full boil and both volume of water and room temperature.

We did not find a clear correlation between heating device and boiling point, but we were interested in those differences.

Spatz-O'Brien Homeschool
11/21/03

 

Williamstown High School Grade 9

Williamstown, NJ

We compared the correlation coefficients on the graphs and found that the variable that had the greatest influence on boiling point was the elevation. We realized from looking at the graph that the higher the elevation, the lower the boiling point. Also, at lower elevations, the boiling point is higher. We discussed how this result helps us make sense of different cooking directions for high altitudes. If the water boils at a lower temperature at high altitudes, it will take a longer time to cook the food. We know that as elevation increases, air pressure decreases. Thus, there are less air molecules pushing down on the water. As a result, less energy has to go into making the bubbles in the water "tough" enough to stand up to the outside pressure -- hence, a lower boiling point at high altitudes. The greater air pressure at lower altitudes explains the higher boiling point there. We also found that the amount of water, room temperature and heating device influenced the amount of time, but not really the boiling point of water. We learned how to make graphs on Excel, what a trend line and correlation coefficient were, and that something does not have to be "hot" to boil.

 

Lovington Junior High School

Lovington, New Mexico

Dawn J. & Christina R., Mrs. Benson's 1st Period Class
We learned that certain factors have a different amount of effect on the boiling point of water. We interpreted our results by making bar and line graphs. The conclusion that we reached was that elevation has the most effect on the boiling point of water. Next time we would probably use a different type of water to see if it has any more effect than distilled water and the boiling point of water.

Haleigh M., Serena S., Adriana T., William H. & Harley R, Mrs. Benson's 2nd Period Class
In the boiling point project, we learned that the elevation has a great effect on boiling point. We interpreted our results by comparing the temperature of the rest of the class and their boiling point. We used the correlation coefficient to decide that elevation had the greatest impact on boiling point. The conclusion that we reached is that the elevation has the most effect on boiling point. We could use a different heating device [next time]. Our beakers could have been smaller or larger. Also, the amount of water could have been highered or lowered. We think that the project takes effort, because you have to do steps in order, and the project has many direction.

Jaime N., Allen G., & Armando F., Mrs. Benson's 3rd Period Class
We learned that elevation has effect on the water's boiling point. We also learned that the heating source also has an effect on the boiling point project. We interpreted our results using line graphs and the correlation coefficient. The conclusion we reached was understanding the line graphs and how much elevation has to do with the boiling point, the room temperature was also a factor. Next time we will use [a] different heating source and room temperature. We will also use a different amount of water. We will test the difference between purified water and distilled water. We might also test different types of thermometers.

Chelsea M., Jacob C., Ali A., & Cassey C., Mrs. Benson's 4th Period Class
We learned that elevation had the biggest effect on the boiling point of water. We used the numbers we got as results and put it into line graphs so they would be easier to read. Our hypothesis was that the heat source would have the greatest effect on the boiling point but we came to the conclusion that elevation had the greatest effect on the boiling point of water. Next time we could use a different heating device or use a different amount of water. Instead of using distilled water we could use salt water.

Leslie A., Mrs. Benson's 6th Period Class
In our science project something new I learned was that we needed lots of information. The way my class interpreted the results was putting all the numbers we got into a graph. The conclusion we reached was that water boiled better in what type of elevation it was in. The things that I would do differently would be the numbers of boiling point. Instead of getting all the information out of every participating school in all the world I would only do the United States.

Edgar M., Eddy S., Luis C., & Nathan H., Mrs. Benson's 7th Period Class
We learned how to calibrate the thermometer. We also learned when water stays at a certain temperature for five minutes at one certain degree, that is the boiling point of water. We interpreted the results by graphing, averaging, and finding the correlation coefficient. The conclusion is that elevation had the most effect on the boiling point of water. Next time we will use a gas stove to heat the water. We would use a stainless steel pan to put the water in.

 

Cheryl Rice, Maxson Middle School

Plainfield, New Jersey

Dear Fellow Students:

This final report is a synopsis of the findings of the four sections of science classes which participated in this project.

Our classes completed the data analysis today. We found that overall, elevation had the highest correlation to boiling point. We never did scatter plot graphs before and we wanted to try to connect the dots.

Most of us thought that the volume of water would affect the boiling point. We did discover that the amount of water might affect the length of time needed to raise the temperature to the boiling point. It didn't seem to affect the actual boiling point.

We also found that there didn't seem to be a correlation between boiling point and room temperature. The data were all over the place!

Our classes analyzed the rate of change at the beginning of the experiment compared to the end of the experiment. We found that at the beginning of the experiment, the rate of change was much higher than at the end. When we reached the temperatures close to the boiling point, the temperature didn't change much. We graphed this information, too.

We enjoyed participating in this project and hope to do another one in the future.

Thank you,

The Students of Ms. Rice's Science Classes
Maxson Middle School-Grade 8
Plainfield, New Jersey USA

 

Preble High School

Green Bay, Wisconsin

Our first hour Physical Science class at Preble High School had an interesting time completing this experiment. We stated in our letter of introduction that the higher the elevation the less pressure there is, therefore there is less pressure holding the water down allowing it to boil at lower temperatures. After analyzing the data there did seem to be a correlation between boiling point and elevation. We are still not sure if it has to do with the water being held down by the atmosphere. Besides learning about the boiling point we learned a lot about teamwork and the importance of all doing our part. It was great to get to collaborate with kids from all over the world. Thanks for the opportunity!

 

Beardsley Middle School

Crystal Lake, Illinois

Two classes from our school explored this project. We were given 11 questions to address about the data. Below you will find our answers. This was a fun project for all 32 of us.


1) The one factor that showed the most correlation with the temperature was elevation. The additional factors had some consequence, but over all it was altitude that had the greatest correlation with the boiling point. For example when the elevation was 23 meters above sea level the temperature was consistently around 96 degrees(C.).

2) When our team made our hypothesis, we decided that boiling point depended largely on elevation and temperature above the water. We predicted that the higher the elevation, the lower the boiling point because the pressure would be lowered, thus the water would need less power to push up against the air. Another important idea was that the warmer the air above the water, the lower the boiling point because the heat source would need less time to heat the air above the water, which would make boiling easier. Our results quickly told us that we were wrong; our data differed fractionally. We were somewhat surprised at others' results, as elevation seemed to matter little in some instancesthe boiling point at an elevation of 548.7 meters was only 1.7 degrees lower than that at an elevation of 22 meters! The boiling point was not constant at the same elevations and times, as well. Usually, fluctuations were small at a given elevation room wide temperature, but this data still negated our hypothesis.

3) We accumulated the results we did for several different reasons. One reason that we had differed results was because we used several different methods for heating. One of these methods of heating was to use an alcohol burner. The alcohol burner never achieved the boiling point. This is because it only contained an individual flame heating the beaker of water. The hot plate boiled the water at an average speed. This was because the hot plate had a very hot, cylindrical surface touching the entire bottom of the beaker. It still heated much slower than the gas and electric burners however, because they warmed up very quickly. The hot plate took a very long time warm up, but it was delivering a consistently hot temperature at all times.

4) Wray, Colorado. The boiling point would be lower because it would be higher elevation and lower air pressure than us. We think it is 96 degrees Celsius. It is actually 95.99 degrees Celsius. We were very close.

5) The accuracy of measurements in this report are very important for in order to determine the boiling point of the exact location that you are in you must have precise measurements for all of the variables and necessary setup information. Slight differences in room temperature and true altitude can give the lab false results. There was only one major possible source of error that could have changed vital information in the lab, and involved poor temperature measurements for room temperature and water. If there was even a slight error in measurements for the temperature, especially for the final boiling point, then the lab's final information may be false. Setup of the lab equipment was also very important, for if the thermometer touched the bottom of the beaker, then one would get a false reading for the temperature of the liquid.

6) The new thing that we learned was that the temperature of our water could rise up to 102.25 when we continued to heat the water past boiling.

7) Another variable I would like to test to see how it might affect the boiling point would be to test it on water starting at different temperatures. I would expect them to all start boiling at 100 degrees, but they would take different amounts of time to get the boiling point.

8) "Boiling Point of Water" Did You Know? 31 Oct. 2003 < http://www.didyouknow.cd/celsius.htm >
"Boiling Water at Less than 100 C or 212 F" Kingsford 31 Oct. 2003 www.kingsford.org/khsWeb/rfs/elemsci/boil.html

9) Boiling. Encyclopedia America, 2002
Boiling Point. The World Encyclopedia, 1999

10) Looking at the large amounts of information included in the chart, you know that you must pick through only the important things. First, overlook all information not important to you. We checked all of the information to see what was important to us. We knew that location did not matter, nor date, so we eliminated those right away. We checked the volume of water compared to the other statistics to see that it did not effect the boiling point, so we eliminated that too. We looked over all the possible factors and eliminated them until we found the only important factors were altitude and boiling point. Then we eliminated similar altitudes and boiling points until we only had the information that we knew we needed.

11) In conclusion, our hypothesis was partially correct. In our hypothesis we stated that the boiling point depends largely on the elevation, pressure, and temperature above the water. In the results however, the correlation between the boiling point and the elevation were inconsistent, but it was indeed the most common factor, although inconsistent. For further experimentation in the future, it would be interesting to how fast water can boil and the factors that cause it to do so.

 

Independence Middle School 7th hour science

Independence, Kansas

The purpose of the project was to see which factor or variable had the greatest influence on average boiling point. Some of our variables were elevation, heating device, room temperature, and volume of water. Our hypothesis was: Elevation had the most influence on the average boiling point.
There were 149 schools participating in this same project. Some of these schools were from places like Oklahoma, Illinois, New Jersey, Italy, New Zealand, and Egypt. The project was preformed rather simply. We heated a hot plate to a temperature of 350 degrees Celsius, and then put 400 milliliters of distilled water into a beaker and put a thermometer in with it. Then we put the beaker of water on the hot plate. Every 30 seconds we checked the thermometer. We repeated this until the temperature stayed the same for at least five minutes. We did this procedure for three days in a row.
We created four scatter plot graphs. On our graphs the independent variable was on the x-axis and the dependent variable was on the y-axis. The independent variables were room temperature, heating device, elevation, and volume of water. The dependent variable was the boiling point. Our controlled variable was distilled water. The best-fit line and correlation coefficient allowed us to determine which variable had the greatest influence on the boiling point. The best fit line divided the points in half equally into top and bottom halves.
The variable that had the greatest influence on boiling point is the elevation. This is because; as elevation increases the air pressure decreases which makes it easier for the water to boil. We generated charts and added trend lines to determine which one had the greatest correlation coefficient. Our class hypothesis was that elevation would have the greatest influence on the boiling point. So it was supported because elevation turned out to have the greatest influence on boiling point. It would also be interesting if we used different variables such as bottled water, tap water, or salt water.

 

Independence Middle School 6th hour science

Independence, Kansas

The purpose of this project is to find out what affects the boiling point of water the most. The independent variables were: heating device, room temperature, elevation, and the volume of the water. There were one hundred forty nine schools that participated in this project. Some of the schools that participated were schools that are located in Ireland, New Zealand, Australia, Egypt, and Italy. Most of the schools that participated in this project are located in the U.S. The lab was done by heating water until it remained at a certain temperature for a time of five minutes. Once the water remained constant for that amount of time we recorded the temperature and that was our boiling point.
The kind of graph that we used during this experiment was a scatter plot graph. The independent variable in this experiment was the boiling point. We were able to determine which variable had the greatest influence on boiling point by comparing the trendline and correlation coefficients; looking at these two, you could determine which factor had the greatest influence on boiling point.
In this experiment we have concluded that the greatest influence in the boiling point was the elevation. The elevation had the most influence on the boiling point because the higher up you get the air pressure is thinner and the boiling point of the water is much lower, but because it has less heat energy it would take longer to boil potatoes, macaroni, ramen noodles, at higher elevations. Our class hypothesis which was: If you change the heating device then that will have the greatest influence on the boiling point was not reliable. An unreliable hypothesis would not change which factor had the most influence on boiling point. In a different experiment we could change the controlled variable that was distilled water, to pond water to see which factor had the most influence on boiling point.

 

Converse Elementary

Converse, Texas

We have found that neither the amount of water used nor the temperature of the room have any significant bearing on the temperature at which water will boil.

However, we did notice a significant difference based on the elevation of the school. We believe that water boils at a lower temperature in the mountains because the atmosphere gets thinner as you go towards space. This means there is less pressure, so the molecules are already further apart and need less heat to really get them moving. Near sea level, the pressure is much greater so the molecules are closer together, and it takes more energy to get them moving fast enough to boil.

We really enjoyed this project. So long from Converse Elementary.

 

Independence Middle School 1st hour Science

Independence, Kansas

This project is called Boil, Boil, Toil and Trouble. The purpose of this project was to find the factor that had the greatest influence on boiling point. The greatest influence on boiling point is elevation. The number of schools that participated was 149. The schools were in Ireland, Egypt, New Zealand, Italy, and Australia. We conducted our experiment by filling a beaker to 250 ml with water. We then placed it on the heating device, which was a hotplate. We placed a ruler on top of it and put the thermometer through the middel hole in the ruler. We timed it and checked it's temperature every 30 seconds and recorded it until it stayed at a certain temperature for 5 minutes.
In our project we made three scatter plot graphs. Our graphs were on elevation, volume of water, and room temperature. All of our scatter plot graphs will tell you all the information that was in the experiment like the elevation, volume of water and room temperature. There was also another factor for these scatter plot graphs that compared with all the other information. That factor was the boiling point. In our experiment we had independent variables and dependent variables. Our independent variables were: elevation, volume of water, room temperature, and also the heating device. The dependent variable that we used in our experiment would be the boiling point. The variable that stayed constant was the type of water. Our trend line or best fit line was used to divide the points equally on both sides of the graph. The correlation coefficient shows which variable had the largest influence on boiling point temperature.
At the conclusion of our experiment our group found that the variable that had the greatest influence on the boiling point was elevation. By looking at our charts, we were able to determine the correlation coefficient and the trendline. Our class hypothesis was not reliable because we thought the variable with the greatest influence would be the volume of water. This did not change the outcome of the lab. This lab could be changed in many different ways such as adding salt to the distilled water. We would investigate the affect on boiling point - increase or decrease.

 

Independence Middle School 1st hour Science

Independence, Kansas

The project is called, "Boil, Boil, Toil, and Trouble." The purpose of the project was to find the single factor that had the greatest influence on boiling point. There were 149 schools that participated. Some of the schools are from Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, Tennessee, Missouri, Egypt, Australia, and Italy. We started the project by pouring 300 ml of water into a beaker. We used a hot plate as a heating device. We set the hotplate to 250 degrees to boil the water. The water was set in a beaker with a thermometer in it. Every 30 seconds we checked it. The average temperature was 94 degrees Celsius.

In this investigation we used scatter plot graphs. The independent variables were elevation, volume of water, heating device, and room temperature. The dependent variable was the boiling point of the distilled water. A best fit line or trendline was used to separate information on a scatter plot graph to make an even amount of points on each side.

The greatest influence on boiling point is elevation. In order to determine this fact, we created three graphs that included a trendline and a correlation coefficient. The correlation coefficient allowed us to determine which factor had the greatest influence on boiling point. If we were to change this lab, the new variable would be salt water verses boiling point.

 

Ruffing Montessori School

Rocky River, Ohio

Hi, we're the eighth grade class of Ruffing Montessori. We thought the boiling project was really fun. Also, we thought that it was really awesome that schools from other countries participated.

Hypothesis: Our hypothesis was that the higher the elevation, the lower the boiling point. The volume of water and the room temperature wouldn't matter much.

We were right, the elevation did have an effect on the boiling point. We learned that the volume of water didn't have much of an effect on the temperature. The higher temperature of the room, the less time it takes for water to boil. Another factor which affects the boiling point is the type of heating device used. We found that if you use a hot plate, a gas stove, or a Bunsen Burner, the water boils faster. Also, we found out that our school had the lowest boiling point out of all the schools that participated.

We made three graphs for elevation vs. boiling point, volume vs. boiling point, and room temperature vs. boiling point for all the schools that participated. Also, we made a graph of the average boiling point of all the schools that participated.

We really enjoyed this project, it was a lot of fun. I hope our school can participate next year. Thank you.

From:
The Eighth Grade Class of Ruffing Montessori
Class of 2004!

 

Brother Rice

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

To whom it may concern:

We recently completed our findings on the international boiling point project. We hypothisized that the boiling point of distilled water is altered based on the elevation of the place it is boiled. Our elevation is 980 meters. Through our experiment we observed that, at our current elevation, distilled water boiled, on average, at 98.9 degrees Celsius. We concluded, that due to our elevation, the boiling point was 1.1 degrees Celsius lower than the accepted boiling point of water of 100 degrees Celsius.

Thank you for the sponsorship of this program.
-Ms. DeSimone's 8th period Chemistry class at Brother Rice High School in Bloomfield Hills MI

 

Michele Colabraro

Bayonne, New Jersey

Final Report from PS #14

Hello from the sixth grade students of PS #14 in Bayonne, NJ. Our school is located in Bayonne, NJ. Our schools coordinates are Latitude: 40.666399N, Longitude: 74.119169W.
The boiling point project was cool. We felt this was because we never participated in this kind of project before. What was so interesting was that schools all over the world were doing the same project. It was very fascinating to see many different results and try to find out a pattern between them. We also enjoyed learning how to use spreadsheets and move the data around to create the graphs we needed.
Our hypothesis was that the lower the elevation, the higher the boiling point. What was interesting was when we read through all of the data, we saw that there were a couple of schools with higher elevation than us and a higher boiling point.
We all enjoyed being a part of this kind of project and would like to participate in another online project.

PS #14
311 Avenue E
Bayonne, NJ 07002

Grade 6 Mrs. Bonner
Grade 6 Mrs. Squitierri
Coordinator: Mrs. Colabraro, Technology Teacher

 

Shiloh School

Hume, IL

The students in Mrs. Carroll's science classes at Shiloh School in Hume, Illinois really enjoyed participating in this project. It was exciting to be a part of a global activity and to imagine that students all over the world were doing the same things that we were doing. We were also glad to have the opportunity to use our computers and probes that came with our new science cart. It made our data collection easier and more accurate.

It was interesting to have access to the data from the participating schools. We used Excel to sort and graph the information. We used our graphs in reports that explained the relationship between the four factors and the boiling point of water. Although most of us believed that elevation would have the greatest effect on boiling point, it was a little difficult to tell by the graphs. The elevation graph did show a trend, but it was only at the higher elevations. Some of the data didn't seem to fit. This gave us a chance to discuss the various factors that might affect the accuracy of the data submitted. We believe that small errors in calibration or measuring elevation could make a big difference in the results.

 

Thomas Jefferson Middle School

Fairlawn, New Jersey

The hypothesis of our 7th grade physical science class at Thomas Jefferson Middle School in Fair Lawn, New Jersey, stated that as elevation increased, the air pressure decreased, which would result in a lower boiling point. Our own school results proved true to the hypothesis. Our elevation is 34m and our boiling point was slightly lower than 100C.

However, looking at the overall results from all the other schools, the results did not support our hypothesis. We believe that experimental error was the cause such as not calibrating the thermometer correctly, not using distilled water, or taking incorrect readings.

This was a wonderful experience. Some of the things that we learned were: how important it is to take accurate readings and keep accurate records, work together as a group, and that once the water is boiling the temperature doesn't increase.