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Equipment

Production Tools

  • 1 Notebook for recording data and design process
  • 10 pH paper strips (to test after each stage of filtration)
  • 1 Multi-meter
  • 1 9-volt battery
  • 1 9-volt batter cap
  • 1 Wire strippers
  • Utility knife
  • 1 paperclip
  • 1 teaspoon or other stirring utensil (chopsticks work well)
  • 1 tablespoon for alum
  • 1 Measuring cup
  • 1 large jugs/jars (approximately 1 gallon size - plastic gallon milk jugs with lids are great), for mixing/storing "Polluted Water" (recipe follows)

System Materials

  • Rubber gloves (1 pair per student)
  • 2 2-liter bottle cut in half horizontally
  • 1 2-liter bottle not cut in half
  • 2 1-liter bottle
  • 1 3-inch square of mesh (fine nylon screen, fine cheese-cloth, etc.)
  • 1 rubber band

Filter materials

  • 2 tablespoons of alum (potassium aluminum sulfate available in the spice isle at grocery stores)
  • Filter paper or large coffee filter (at least 6" in diameter)
  • 12"x12" cheese clothe
  • 10"x10" plastic wrap
  • 6 cotton balls
  • 2 sponges
  • 2 pair knee high stockings
  • 2 cups fine sand
  • 2 cups coarse sand
  • 1 dozen large and small pebbles (total)
  • 2 cup activated charcoal (used for potting plants and in aquariums)

Polluted Water Solution

1 ½ gallon jug of "Polluted Water" (made by mixing the following, two days in advance and setting in the sun. You may want the students to watch you make the mixture so they know what is in it. (Create a story to explain how each contaminant got into the water.)

  • Water (enough to fill the jugs/jars approximately ¾ full)
  • Green food coloring (1 teaspoon)
  • Organic matter (grass clippings, orange rinds, etc.) (1/4 cup)
  • Dishwashing detergent (1 teaspoon)
  • Vinegar (1 teaspoon)
  • Mineral Oil (teaspoon)
  • Salt (1teaspoon)
  • Pepper (teaspoon)
  • Pieces of polystyrene foam (foam peanuts) (1/4 cup)
  • Small pieces of newspaper (1/4 cup)