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Science RWLO icon Science RWLOs: Physics
RWLO Title Student Materials Description Author
Uniform Circular Motion (.doc)
- Back-up_Data.doc
1.Worksheet_1.doc
2.Worksheet_2.doc
3.Description_of_Uniform_Circular_Motion.doc
-Assessment_of_Uniform_Circular_Motion.doc
Study motion on a circle at constant speed. Because the speed is constant, students have the misconception that there is no acceleration. At the root of this problem is the fact that students forget that the acceleration of an object changes its velocity, not only its speed. Maria Cecilia Rozak, Associate Professor, Essex County College
Magnetic Fields and the Sun or So its the Sun, Who Cares? (.doc) See RWLO file Students will print Solar Magnetograms and images of the Sun in the electromagnetic spectrum (visible or otherwise), compare the images, draw conclusions about the effects of the Sun’s Magnetic Field, determine if their conclusions are correct, and discover the need to study and watch the Sun. Michael Dorneman, Professor, Mercer County Community College
Relative Velocity and Vectors Student Directions and Assessment Students will access real time flight data from aircraft over the United States in order to determine air velocity from ground and wind velocity. David Weaver, Physics Faculty, Chandler-Gilbert Community College
Can you hear me now? (.doc) See RWLO file Students will access the Library of Congress to view Alexander Graham Bell’s original scientific notebook. Based upon Bell’s notes, students will recreate the seminal tuning fork experiment. David Weaver, Physics Faculty, Chandler-Gilbert Community College
Linear Motion - Position Versus Time (.doc) 1.Introduction_to_Motion.doc
2.Motion_Diagrams.doc
3.content_materials_motion_graphs.doc
4.content_materials_motion_translate.doc
5.content_materials_motion_track.doc
Students use real time data from satellites in orbit and plot position vs. time data to determine the average speed of the vessel. Furthermore, students will draw motion diagrams, draw qualitative position vs. time graphs, describe the motion of objects, and translate between these multiple representations. David Weaver, Physics Faculty, Chandler-Gilbert Community College
Calculate the Mass of The Earth (.doc)

Student Directions

Student Worksheet

Students use satellite location and velocity to calculate the mass of the earth Michael Dorneman,Associate Professor, Mercer Co. Community College
Linear Motion - Velocity Versus Time (.doc) 1. intro_v-t.doc
2. motion_diagram_v-t.doc
3. velocity_graph.doc
4. translate.doc
5. data_collection.doc
Students will use real time data from satellites in orbit to determine it's velocity & calculate how long it will take to appear over a chosen place on the planet. Furthermore, students will draw motion diagrams, qualitative position vs. time and velocity vs. time graphs, describe the motion of objects, & translate between these multiple representations. David Weaver, Physics Faculty, Chandler-Gilbert Community College
Uniform Circular Motion See Word document Students in a Physics or Physical Science class will analyze data obtained on the World Wide Web on the location of satellites in orbit and through the calculations experience what is meant by “uniform circular motion”. Maria Bautista, Professor, Kapi'olani Community College