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Part B: Look for Patterns

 

  1. Click on the earthquake link below to see many of the earthquakes that have occurred recently. Note the time and date for the earthquakes that have occurred in the past week as well as the latitude and longitude coordinates for the epicenter of the earthquake.
  2. Using the latitude and longitude coordinates, plot the locations of earthquakes that have occurred in the past week on a world map. You can either do this manually or by copying/pasting the data into a spreadsheet and then creating a scatter plot of the data. If you do this, be sure to plot longitude on the x-axis and latitude on the y-axis so that the scatter plot represents what you would see if you looked at a world map.

     [
    NOTE: a positive latitude corresponds to degrees North and a negative latitude corresponds to degrees South. A positive longitude corresponds to degrees East and a negative longitude corresponds to degrees West. More information about latitude and longitude and links to world maps can be found in the Supplementary Resources section.]
  3. Do you notice any pattern to the data? Describe the pattern that you see, if any. Do the data support or refute your hypothesis? Explain. State a revised hypothesis and prediction, if necessary.












  4. Add data for the earthquakes that have occurred in the rest of the month to your plot. Do the additional data support or refute your hypothesis? Give some examples to support your statement.








 
5.  Explain why it is useful and important to establish a pattern to earthquake data.












 

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