Who is the Average Traveler Today? (2.27.07)

Today we are going to find out who traveled the average distance to get to this workshop. First we'll start off with a guess. What do you think is the average distance that the members of this group traveled today? That is, the distance from your point of origin this morning to your current location.

We are going to find your distance in two ways:

1. "As the crow flies"

2. "Door-to-door" distance 3.  Record your results on the data page (see page 3 of this activity). Collect the door-to-door data from other members of the group and record them in your table. Other related questions
  1. Which distance was greater for you: the “as the crow flies” or door-to-door distance? Do you think this will always be the case? Explain.
  2. In the door-to-door travel, compare the estimated time with the time it actually took you. What are some of the factors that account for the difference (or might have affected it)?
  3. What was your average speed?
Related classroom activity
  1. Get a map of the tri-state area. (Printout or screen shot from Mapblast.com or www.indo.com will suffice.)
  2. Use a ruler to draw (or measure) a line from your point of origin to Hoboken and measure it.
  3. Using the scale indicated, determine the distance. ________
Extension (Sample HSPA/GEPA problem)
A group of friends attending college in New York City decide during spring vacaton to visit friends by car in the following cities: Boston, Pittsburgh, and Washington, DC. There are many choices as to the order of visiting the cities and returning to New York City, but the friends want to design a route that minimizes the amount of time they will be traveling while maximizing the time visiting with their friends.
Mileage
 
Boston
New York
Pittsburgh
Wash, DC
Boston
       
New York
       
Pittsburgh
       
Wash, DC